How Many Amendments to the Constitution?

How Many Amendments to the Constitution?

How Many Amendments to the Constitution?
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How Many Amendments to the Constitution?How Many Amendments to the Constitution?

As of February of 2011, 27 Constitutional Amendments currently exist; the first Amendment to the Constitution was adopted on September 25th, 1789 – the most recent Amendment to the Constitution was adopted on May 5th – 7th of 1992.

How Many Amendments to the Constitution Have Been Rejected?

Since the proposal – and subsequent passing – of the first 10 Amendments, which are known as the Bill of Rights, a total of 6 Amendments have been proposed and eventually denied:

Amendment Name: Congressional Appointment Amendment

Content of the Amendment: The regulation of the appointment process with regard to state representation; this Amendment proposes that a calculation with regard to this appointment exist at a rate of 1 representative per every 30,000 residents with regard to an individual state

Date of Proposal: September 25th, 1789

Current Status of the Amendment: Pending

Amendment Name: Titles of Nobility Amendment

Content of the Amendment: This Amendment proposes that any individual citizen of the United States of America be subject to forego their respective citizenship in the event that they are the recipient of a title or appointment from a country or nation other than that of the United States

Date of Proposal: May 1st, 1810

Current Status of the Amendment: Pending

Amendment Name: Corwin Amendment

Content of the Amendment: This Amendment prohibits the ability or jurisdiction allowed to Congress with regard to its respective involvement in matters concerning individual states; this Amendment was an attempt to allow slavery to remain legal within individual states wishing to permit it – however, the 13th Amendment subsequently abolished slavery on a national level

Date of Proposal: March 2nd, 1861

Current Status of the Amendment: Pending, but has been deemed contrary to the Constitution

Amendment Name: Child Labor Amendment

Content of the Amendment: This proposed Amendment allows Congress that ability to regulate, authenticate, and maintain jurisdiction over the employment of individuals under 18 years of age; upon ratification, this Amendment would allow Congress to overturn individual state legislature with regard to labor classified as ‘Child Labor’

Date of Proposal: June 2nd, 1924

Current Status of the Amendment: Pending

Amendment Name: Equal Rights Amendments

Content of the Amendment: This proposed Amendment ensures that upon ratification, gender will be considered immaterial with regard to all activities and opportunities taking place on both a state and national level; this Amendment allows Congress to enforce this legislation on both a gubernatorial, as well as state level

Date of Proposal: March 22nd, 1972

Current Status of the Amendment: Expired between 1979 and 1982; however, certain individuals maintain that a lack of an expressed date of expression within the Amendment precludes it from expiration

Amendment Name: District of Columbia Voting Rights Amendment

Content of the Amendment: This proposed Amendment – upon ratification – would allow the District of Columbia the opportunity to appoint and maintain representation from an individual Electoral College

Date of Proposal: August 22nd, 1978

Current Status of the Amendment: Expired in 1985

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