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Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?

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Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?When posed with the question ‘Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?’ the answer may prove to be fairly ambiguous in its delivery; although historians vary with regard to their respective responses to this question, George Mason and James Madison are considered to be amongst the 2 primary candidates with regard to the authorship of the Bill of Rights.James Madison: Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?James Madison – alongside of James Madison - is credited with both the creation, as well as the conception of the Bill of Rights; as a result of his notice of the absence of a Constitutional Clause providing a system for both the amendment and adjustment of the original text, a clause was subsequently created rectifying these concerns – the actions of James Madison resulted in the proposal of the Bill of Rights in 1789, as well as its subsequent ratification in 1791.George Mason: Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?George Mason was a delegate from the state of Virginia, who is credited alongside James Madison with the passing – and subsequent creation - of the Bill of Rights; Mason is noted for his refusal to sign the Constitution. George Mason considered the fact that the Constitution lacked a clause that allowed for the passing of amendments, the addition of this clause would become the Bill of Rights. Who Wrote the Bill of Rights? – An ExplorationThe Bill of rights not only outlined a framework for a legislative system, but also mandated an identifiable statute with regard to alterations, adjustments, and modifications to the original text; the following is an exploration of the first 10 Constitutional Amendments – also known as the bill of Rights:1st AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: This Amendment affords citizens of the United States with the freedom of religion, the freedom of press, the freedom of speech, and the right of assembly2nd AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The right to bear arms in a lawful manner with regard to self-protection; firearms covered under the 2nd Amendment do not address service within the Militia3rd AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 3rd Amendment prohibits unlawful entry with regard to private resident(s) in possession of citizens of the United States of America; the 3rd Amendment is not typically applicable to times of war4th AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 4th Amendment prohibits the unlawful search and seizure of resident belonging to citizens of the United States of America; this amendment also defines the rights of privacy awarded to citizens of the United States5th AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 5th Amendment addresses the modern incarnation of the ‘Right to remain silent’; this Amendment also prevents the unlawful and unethical abuse of power undertaken by a governing body6th AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 6th Amendment addresses legal procedure undertaken with regard to the prosecution – and investigation – of alleged criminal activity; this Amendment includes the right to a judicially-sound trial7th AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 7th Amendment affords individuals undergoing judicial trials with the right to be tried in accordance with the presence of a jury; juries present within judicial trials are indicated to consist of an individual’s ‘peers’8th AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 8th Amendment addresses legal criminal procedure; this Amendment prohibits punitive recourse classified as ‘cruel and unusual’ with regard to prosecution, as well as the prohibition of an excessive bail process9th AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 9th Amendment serves as legislative protection with regard to corollary Amendments within the Bill of Rights; this Amendment disallows for the violation of civil liberties and unlawful expansion of governmental power10th AmendmentDate Proposed: September, 25th 1789Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791Contents of the Amendment: The 10th Amendment addresses the apportionment process latent within administrative responsibilities; this Amendment expressed that any or all administrative powers that have not been claimed by Federal or State governments become the responsibility of the general populace
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  • Who Wrote The Bill Of Rights

    Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?

    When posed with the question ‘Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?’ the answer may prove to be fairly ambiguous in its delivery; although historians vary with regard to their respective responses to this question, George Mason and James Madison are considered to be amongst the 2 primary candidates with regard to the authorship of the Bill of Rights.

    James Madison: Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?

    James Madison – alongside of James Madison - is credited with both the creation, as well as the conception of the Bill of Rights; as a result of his notice of the absence of a Constitutional Clause providing a system for both the amendment and adjustment of the original text, a clause was subsequently created rectifying these concerns – the actions of James Madison resulted in the proposal of the Bill of Rights in 1789, as well as its subsequent ratification in 1791.

    George Mason: Who Wrote the Bill of Rights?

    George Mason was a delegate from the state of Virginia, who is credited alongside James Madison with the passing – and subsequent creation - of the Bill of Rights; Mason is noted for his refusal to sign the Constitution. George Mason considered the fact that the Constitution lacked a clause that allowed for the passing of amendments, the addition of this clause would become the Bill of Rights.

    Who Wrote the Bill of Rights? – An Exploration

    The Bill of rights not only outlined a framework for a legislative system, but also mandated an identifiable statute with regard to alterations, adjustments, and modifications to the original text; the following is an exploration of the first 10 Constitutional Amendments – also known as the bill of Rights:

    1st Amendment


    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: This Amendment affords citizens of the United States with the freedom of religion, the freedom of press, the freedom of speech, and the right of assembly

    2nd Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The right to bear arms in a lawful manner with regard to self-protection; firearms covered under the 2nd Amendment do not address service within the Militia

    3rd Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 3rd Amendment prohibits unlawful entry with regard to private resident(s) in possession of citizens of the United States of America; the 3rd Amendment is not typically applicable to times of war

    4th Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 4th Amendment prohibits the unlawful search and seizure of resident belonging to citizens of the United States of America; this amendment also defines the rights of privacy awarded to citizens of the United States

    5th Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 5th Amendment addresses the modern incarnation of the ‘Right to remain silent’; this Amendment also prevents the unlawful and unethical abuse of power undertaken by a governing body

    6th Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 6th Amendment addresses legal procedure undertaken with regard to the prosecution – and investigation – of alleged criminal activity; this Amendment includes the right to a judicially-sound trial

    7th Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 7th Amendment affords individuals undergoing judicial trials with the right to be tried in accordance with the presence of a jury; juries present within judicial trials are indicated to consist of an individual’s ‘peers’

    8th Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 8th Amendment addresses legal criminal procedure; this Amendment prohibits punitive recourse classified as ‘cruel and unusual’ with regard to prosecution, as well as the prohibition of an excessive bail process

    9th Amendment

    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 9th Amendment serves as legislative protection with regard to corollary Amendments within the Bill of Rights; this Amendment disallows for the violation of civil liberties and unlawful expansion of governmental power

    10th Amendment


    Date Proposed: September, 25th 1789

    Date Ratified: December 15th, 1791

    Contents of the Amendment: The 10th Amendment addresses the apportionment process latent within administrative responsibilities; this Amendment expressed that any or all administrative powers that have not been claimed by Federal or State governments become the responsibility of the general populace

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