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The Words of the Declaration of Independence

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Authored in 1776 by Thomas Jefferson with the help of fellow political leaders such as John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, the Declaration of Independence was the inaugural piece of legislative documentation in the history of the United states of America. Ratified on July 4th, 1776, the document stated that the United States of America was no longer under the control of the British Monarchy of King George III, and as a result, was free to operate as a sovereign nation independent of any ties to England. However, the Declaration of Independence was a multi-layered document upon whose creation included two separate functions.In addition to the primary one that established the United States of America as an independent nation, an additional function of the Declaration of Independence was a listing of the perceived legislative infractions and humanitarian crimes the authors of the Declaration of Independence had perceived to be committed on the part of King George III in the spectrum of the British Monarchy. The document set forth a vow to the citizens of the United States of America that the governing body would never exist as a tyranny that acted to serve the needs of the aristocracy in lieu of the general public. This statement in and of itself was extremely incendiary. The authors of the Declaration of Independence were both establishing and maintaining the sovereignty of a newly-sovereign nation in the wake of a bloody revolution in which many men perished in the service of their country. The document ascertained that the citizens of the United States of America had freed themselves from a tyrannical and totalitarian governing body by whom they had felt both betrayed and wronged. Furthermore, the words of the Declaration of Independence ensure that any subsequent governing bodies will be sworn to act on the behalf of the people that it serves. This was in contrast to their perception of the methodology of a monarchical model of government, which the authors of the Declaration of Independence had noticed in the inverse - citizens living under a monarchical government are servants of the government, while the government serves the aristocratic class. The Declaration of Independence was the first legislative doctrine of its kind, which reshaped the notion of gubernatorial bodies placing the governing body in a role of servitude to its collective citizens. Subsequent to the passing of the Declaration of Independence, the United States of America was formed. Upon arriving at the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the United States of America further established both its sovereignty and independence from the British Monarchy as American and European delegates alike arranged newly-modified foreign relations that no longer involved England. The Declaration of Independence served many functions, but seldom were more prevalent than the establishment of sovereignty on the part of the United States of America. The hardships endured under the rule of a tyrannical governing body in the form of King George III allowed for the prospect of a refusal to recreate those same circumstances in any subsequent American governing body.
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    Authored in 1776 by Thomas Jefferson with the help of fellow political leaders such as John Adams and Benjamin Franklin, the Declaration of Independence was the inaugural piece of legislative documentation in the history of the United states of America. Ratified on July 4th, 1776, the document stated that the United States of America was no longer under the control of the British Monarchy of King George III, and as a result, was free to operate as a sovereign nation independent of any ties to England. However, the Declaration of Independence was a multi-layered document upon whose creation included two separate functions. In addition to the primary one that established the United States of America as an independent nation, an additional function of the Declaration of Independence was a listing of the perceived legislative infractions and humanitarian crimes the authors of the Declaration of Independence had perceived to be committed on the part of King George III in the spectrum of the British Monarchy. The document set forth a vow to the citizens of the United States of America that the governing body would never exist as a tyranny that acted to serve the needs of the aristocracy in lieu of the general public. This statement in and of itself was extremely incendiary. The authors of the Declaration of Independence were both establishing and maintaining the sovereignty of a newly-sovereign nation in the wake of a bloody revolution in which many men perished in the service of their country. The document ascertained that the citizens of the United States of America had freed themselves from a tyrannical and totalitarian governing body by whom they had felt both betrayed and wronged. Furthermore, the words of the Declaration of Independence ensure that any subsequent governing bodies will be sworn to act on the behalf of the people that it serves. This was in contrast to their perception of the methodology of a monarchical model of government, which the authors of the Declaration of Independence had noticed in the inverse - citizens living under a monarchical government are servants of the government, while the government serves the aristocratic class. The Declaration of Independence was the first legislative doctrine of its kind, which reshaped the notion of gubernatorial bodies placing the governing body in a role of servitude to its collective citizens. Subsequent to the passing of the Declaration of Independence, the United States of America was formed. Upon arriving at the Treaty of Paris in 1783, the United States of America further established both its sovereignty and independence from the British Monarchy as American and European delegates alike arranged newly-modified foreign relations that no longer involved England. The Declaration of Independence served many functions, but seldom were more prevalent than the establishment of sovereignty on the part of the United States of America. The hardships endured under the rule of a tyrannical governing body in the form of King George III allowed for the prospect of a refusal to recreate those same circumstances in any subsequent American governing body.

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